Art Urges Voyages.

Glenn Friesen

 

Among the official list of "Emblems of Belief" available for Placement on U.S. Government Headstones and Markers -- I find "Pomegranate" and "Hammer of Thor" to be my favorites.

Outside the official U.S. list, internationally, the Missionary Church of Kopimism is my new favorite. FYI, Kopimism is a congregation of file sharers who believe that copying information is a sacred virtue.

See question on Quora

 

On Enjoyment:

This slideshow is about the effect of typography on emotion (.. check it's works cited! Woot!). It's conclusion? "A well-designed layout encourages positive associates reduces distraction and gives a sense of accomplishment".

On Comprehension:

Less legible fonts are like a rite of passage for comprehension.

People recall what they've read better when it’s printed in smaller, less legible type, according to a 2010 study (princeton.edu); although small & unusual, low-contrast fonts are is also the #1 complaint for web users relating to reading online (Nielsen, 2005).


For information overload, I highly recommend starting with this synthesis of the effect of typography on user experience -- it's oriented to web/digital readability, not print, and contains much actionable insight.

Highlight from the synthesis:

Q: Does legibility influence judgement? A: Yes.


If you're still reading this, I know you want more research! This Prezi is exactly what you want; it summarizes a great deal of research and has an epic works cited: Font and Comprehension.

Some highlights from the Prezi:

Font Size

  • Larger fonts are also easier for children to read (Wilson, 404)
  • Large font sizes decrease the speed of reading for adults (Legge & Bigelow, 7).

Word Familiarity

  • The eye will rest longer on words that are more familiar, and linger on those that are unfamiliar (Slattery & Rayner, 1129)

Font Case

  • Lower case letters are easier to read, because they are more distinctive
  • Fonts that have low variation between letters (e.g., Sassoon) see image are more difficult to read for children (Wilson, 406).

See question on Quora

 

1970's baby-making music frequently employed the use of nascent synthesizer-type tone-based and modulation effects, particularly filters, flangers, and phasers. The Mu-Tron envelope filter, and the ubiquitius wah-wah pedal were particularly common effect pedals used in the era -- you can find both (and more!) mentioned in this list of the effects used by Jerry Garcia: Jerry Garcia guitar history 
 


Effects alter the relationship between instrument and amp. Effects can generally be broken down into four divisions:
  • Gain-based: These effects act on the volume or signal level and respond in various ways. They include distortion, volume pedals, gates, and compressors.
  • Tone-based: These effects affect the tonal color (such as bass and treble signal). They include graphic and parametric EQ, wah-wah pedal, and auto-wah.
  • Modulation: The most “effect-like” of the effects, modulation effects generally do something very remarkable and strange to the sound, such as make the sound sound like it's under water or being electrocuted. These effects include chorus, flanger, phase shifter, rotating speaker, tremolo, and vibrato.
  • Ambience: Ambience effects provide an acoustic "space" or "environment". They include reverb and echo (a.k.a. delay).

Some effects are particularly obvious to the ear, such as flanger, wah-wah, and delay; while others, such as compression, reverb, and perhaps even subtle distortion, are fundamental elements of the instrument's tone, so an audience might not even notice these as effects.


Here is a glossary of different effects: Glossary of Guitar Effects

See question on Quora

 

Excluding pseudo-selectors like :hover, CSS is shorthand for the static visual display of information; whereas jQuery is shorthand for making things on the page change as people interact with them.

Changing font color of one element after a user takes action on a separate element is more a function of jQuery than of CSS.

I recommend you use one of the two methods in the following code example:

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<html><head>

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {

  // place this in your document head, after where it loads jQuery.
    
  function colortext () {	

$('.menu-item-green').click(function() {
$("#content").addClass("greentext");
});

	$('.menu-item-blue').click(function() {
		$("#content").addClass("bluetext");	
	});	
	  		
	$('.menu-item-red').click(function() {
		$("#content").css("color", "red");
	}); 
 }
 // Just in case you want a delay, use setTimeout() to execute; numbers in milliseconds. 
 setTimeout(colortext, 10)
});
</script>

<style>
  /*              
  __ _
| (_| |
 \__, |
  __/ |                                                     
 |___/                                                      

 */
.bluetext {
	color: blue;
}
.greentext {
color: green !important;
}
</style>

</head><body>

<ul><li class="menu-item-blue">Blue</li><li class="menu-item-red">Red</li><li class="menu-item-green">Green</li></ul>

<div id="content">This is the text whose color will change.</div>

</body>	</html>

IMHO, .addClass is a superior technique, compared to .css -- but you may want to use .css to absolutely overwrite (inline) any non-!important font styling set through classes.

See question on Quora

 

friess_figure5

"Either intentionally or unintentionally, the evaluators appeared to seek out confirmation for issues that they had previously identified. For example, in his oral report on P2’s session, Tom mentioned on three separate occasions that P2 “liked” a particular chart. Indeed, P2 did say at one point in the study, “I love this chart,” but P2 never mentioned that particular chart again."